time-machine

SCI-FI INDEX * Action Movies * Comedy Movies * Great Dramas * Musical Index * Romances * FUN ON DEMAND
time machine

THE TIME MACHINE (1960)

The Time Machine, based on the novel by H.G. Wells, tells the adventuresome story of a Victorian inventor in the 1890's, who invents the machine of the century; a working time machine. Eager to embrace what is to come, he travels into the far future, encountering beauty and terror, in a society of unthinking, simple souls, and exploitative killers.

The cast includes Rod Taylor, Alan Young, Yvette Mimieux, Sebastian Cabot, Tom Helmore, Whit Bissell, and Doris Lloyd.

Director George Pal's "The Time Machine" offers wonderful Sci-Fi/fantasy entertainment.

movie-review

the-time-machine

review

movie-review

review

ci-fi

movie-review

review-movie

review

time-machine

the-time-machine

movie-review

review

movie-review

movie-review

sci-fi-movie-review



Promotional Lines: "You Will Orbit into the Fantastic Future!"
"The Time Machine whirls you to a world of amazing adventure in the year 800,000!"


CHOOSE A SITE TO SEARCH
HomeVideos.com
MovieActors.com

 

the-time-machine

time-machine

"The Time Machine," based on the landmark H.G. Wells novel, tells the tale of an inventor, George, in Victorian 1890's England, who travels through time, by using a time machine that he invented and put together. He bravely embarks on a wild, far reaching adventure into the future, where he discovers that mankind has evolved into two races. One race, the Eli, is made up of young, very good looking, very gentle, trusting, ignorant people who have forgotten how to think for themselves, because all their needs are taken care of by the second race of monster-like people, the Morlocks, who periodically harvest them for food.

He finds himself getting involved with these sheep-like people, with one in particular, a young woman called Weena. After meeting the people, he then discovers that he has another problem When the scientist had left his time machine momentarily to explore this strange, new future world, the Morlocks had taken his time machine inside their fortress. Then, because he cares for what is left of the human race, George tries to help them become free from the creatures, to learn to take care of themselves.

When a mysterious horn goes off, Weena and others docily go inside the Morlock's fortress cave. To free Weena and others, and to get his machine back, so he could go back to his own time at some point, he must take his life in his hands and go inside the fortress cave as well.

A favorite scene takes place in an ancient building in the future, which he comes across as he explores this new future world. He discovers how these people sunk to such a state of sheephood. Time traveler George is thrilled to find books in this ancient library of sorts. When he picks up one, it crumbles to dust. In his anger the traveler sweeps his arms across a shelf of books: they all disintegrate into dust. The scene accurately symbolizes the sad state of human knowledge in the far future.

This classic science fiction adventure yarn, adapted from H.G. Wells novella by David Duncan, was directed by the multi-talented, Hungarian born George Pal, who besides being a director, was also a pioneer in the field of creating animation. Before WW2, Pal was head of the cartoon department, at UFA Studios, Berlin. After coming to America to escape Hitler, he created Puppetoons, and received a special academy award for his work in 1943. Around '48-'49, he expanded his interest in the animation field when he became involved with features that combined live action with special photo and sound effects, in such imaginative films as "Seven Faces of Dr. Low," "Tom Thumb," "The War of the Worlds," "The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm," and "Atlantis, the Lost Continent." So, not only did he direct these films, he also was involved with their special effects.

In "The Time Machine," the audience is treated to the realistic physical changes that happen around the time machine, in the work room of George's house, and the neighborhood that can be seen from the large window in the workroom. The visual effects and animation were quite dazzling for 1960! Under the leadership of director Pal, Wah Chang and Gene Warren did the special photographic effects, and Don and David Salin, George and David Pal, Jim Danforth and Tim Barr all worked on the animation. These realistic live action sequences with convincing special photo and visual effects, for which the film won an Academy Award.

A favorite sequence of scenes showing these innovative special effects can be seen when George travels forward in time, and we see history flow past his workshop window to the outside through seasonal changes, the chaniging mannequin in the window in the shop across from his workshop window, WW1, WW2, the bombing of London, etc, and other calamities, until he finally arrives far into the future.

Rod Taylor was perfectly cast as the Victorian time traveler, scientist George, on an adventure in the future. With his rugged looks, and cultured voice, he becomes an elegant, believable representative of the cultured British world of a hundred years ago.

Yvette Mimieux is beautiful and does a good job as Weena, a damsel in distress, who George falls for.Yvette went on to make a string of movies, of varying quality and success. She turned to producing in addition to acting. Besides being involved in the film business, she was trained as an anthropologist and became successful in business.

Taylor and Mimieux's scenes together are pretty good. They meet each other, when Taylor jumps into the water to save her from drowning when she fell in. All of her kind, the Eli, just sat and watched her as she struggled in the water, not concerned at all. As their relationship develops, the audience wonders what this brave inventor is going to do concerning Weena, if he survives the battle with the Morlocks, and decides that it's time for him to travel back to his own time period.

Alan Young offers great support as a friend of Taylor's from the past. Young is best known for starring in the classic TV series "Mr. Ed." Around the late 1970's, Alan found that his voice was in demand and he got a lot of work in various cartoon features.

This film is rated G. The monster people, the Morlocks, may be a little scary for young children. Otherwise it is a great family film with a good moral message about the importance of education, knowing the truth, being self-reliant and standing up for what is right.

time-machine

If you liked THE TIME MACHINE, you may enjoy STAR TREK 4,
BACK TO THE FUTURE, 12 MONKEYS, TERMINATOR 2, TIME AFTER TIME, DUNE, PLANET OF THE APES, and/or PEGGY SUE GOT MARRIED